FAQs

Asset Resolution Partners collectively has decades of experience solving the most complicated property ownership problems. Below are common questions asked by heirs we have contacted.

Why have I been contacted?

ARP receives referrals from Realtors, Attorneys, Judges, Title Companies, Bank Trust Departments, curious neighbors, even mail men about abandoned property and disassociated owners. We also conduct our own research in the county real property records, vital statistics, and court records with the goal of identifying situations that can benefit from our services. If you have been contacted by ARP it is because the company’s research leads us to believe you may have information that can help someone else’s project or you personally may have a claim to property.

If I own interest in a property, why didn’t I know about it before now?

Families often times drift apart and without a common family member keeping track of each person’s family tree and property records in a common place for generations things can fall through the cracks. This is more common than most realize. Additionally, if a person did not leave a will that appointed an Executor or Administrator or one family member did not take charge shortly after their passing, these things can slip away with busy lives.

Am I really an heir, or is this a hoax or something?

Our intentions are strictly legitimate. Collectively the Partners of ARP have a combined 80 years in the business. Our business relies on referrals and good business and we will never ask you for a penny. Our intent is only to resolve problem properties. We are able to provide references of prior clients outside of the testimonials in this website upon request. Additionally, we welcome correspondence from your attorney as that normally helps expedite the process.

How long does this take and when am I paid?

The only common thing about these types of properties is they all have major problems. Every project is quite different and the time between acceptance of the project by ARP and to closing of the accepted sale can happen in as little as a few days or as long as a few months. Remember ARP advances all expenses and risks its own time and resources on the chance of it being a viable project. Our compensation comes in the way of equity in the property. Often our expenses amount to thousands even tens of thousands of dollars, and we never ask clients to risk any of their own money.

What about taxes?

Only six states collect an inheritance tax so it only affects you if the deceased person lived in either Iowa, Kentucky, Maryland, Nebraska, New Jersey, or Pennsylvania. Where you live doesn’t affect inheritance tax. Only the home of the deceased (also called the decedent) or the location of property that you’re inheriting will matter. There is no federal inheritance tax.

Do I have any liability or risk?

No. Even if it is determined that debts or expenses attached to the property outvalue the property, or prior mortgages and liens exist, those run with the land and the and if any, those risks and liabilities are transferred to ARP at the time of the sale of your interest.

How is my share of the property determined?

Your share is determined through your relationship to the decedent and by the total number of claimants, based on the laws of Descent and Distribution of the state or country where the property is located.

What will happen if I do nothing to assure my claim to real property?

Generally, two possibilities exist. One, the property in question will eventually accrue property tax debts in the county where it is located and the tax authorities in that jurisdiction will auction off the property at a Sheriff Tax sale to recover the unpaid property tax bills. Two, unclaimed interests in a properly administered estate could be deposited in the state treasury as escheated funds and then forfeited to the State after the statutory timeline expires.

What’s My Property Share Worth

Valuing an undivided interest (or share) of real property is less straight forward that ordering an appraisal because no amount of ownership is a “controlling interest” as with businesses or partnerships. Additionally, the time and expense associated with resolving all of the title defects and ownership disputes is different with every property. Texas courts have applied discounts as little as ten percent (10%) and as large as sixty percent (60%) on top of legal costs to the prorate share of an undivided interest in real estate. ARP is able to value the “share” of the property based on the known problems and time and expense it estimates is required to cure all of the problems related to the property site, title, and its ownership. Each case and valuation is different.

 

A thorough article about valuing undivided interest published by a global valuation advisory firm is here